Workplace Health and Wellbeing: Managers as Multipliers Podcast
For Your Benefits
For Your Benefits
Workplace Health and Wellbeing: Managers as Multipliers
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Workplace Health and Wellbeing: Managers as Multipliers

Leaders are in a unique position to lead by example and to promote workplace health. In this episode, we talk with Laura Putnam, Founder and CEO of Motion Infusion, and author of the book “Workplace Wellness that Works” about why workplace health and wellbeing are important and the unique role that managers play in empowering employees to feel better. We also discuss how workplace health can be affected by cultural and environmental influencers, and what managers can do to drive better health within their teams.

We’ll be discussing:

  • What the driving force is between the “knowing and doing” gap
  • The four levels of culture influence when it comes to workplace health and wellbeing
  • What it means to be a gatekeeper, multiplier or somewhere in between
  • How leaders can support managers who are interested in driving a culture of good workplace health

Supporting and meeting the needs of everyone in your organization is key to employee retention and productivity. Employees are seeking companies that have great health care benefit packages, but are the benefits being used to befit the employee and employer? That is where integrated health solutions can help. Check out this blog “What is Integrative Health?” to learn more about how it helps engage employees to the benefits and helps employers with cost savings.

In This Podcast

Laura Putnam, Author & CEO, Workplace Health and Wellbeing: Managers as Multipliers Podcast

Laura Putnam, MA

Laura Putnam, MA, author of the #1 Amazon Hot New Release in HR & Personnel Management, Workplace Wellness That Works, is CEO and founder of Motion Infusion, a leading wellbeing and learning provider. Her work has been covered by MSNBC, The New York Times, FOX News, US News & World Report, Entrepreneur, Business Insider, and NPR. Laura is a frequent keynote speaker and has worked with a range of organizations from Fortune 500s to government agencies to academic institutes and nonprofits. She is a member of the Google Vitality Lab and also serves on the Healthstat Strategic Advisory Committee. In addition, she teaches at Stanford University, is the recipient of the American Heart Association’s “2020 Impact” award as well as the National Wellness Institute’s “Circle of Leadership” award. She can be reached at [email protected].

Workplace Wellness That Works: 10 Steps to Infuse Well-being & Vitality into Any Organization Book

Meghan Henry:
Hey, everyone. Welcome back, and thanks for joining this episode of For Your Benefits. I’m your host, Meghan Henry, Marketing Director for SentryHealth, an industry-leading, integrated health management company.

In today’s podcast, we’re talking with Laura Putnam, founder and CEO of Motion Infusion and author of Workplace Wellness That Works. Today, we’re going to talk about why workforce health and wellbeing are important and the unique role that managers play in empowering employees to engage in their own wellness. We’re also going to be discussing how employee wellbeing can be affected by cultural and environmental influencers and what managers can do to drive better health within their teams. Welcome, Laura.

Laura Putnam:
Thanks so much, Meghan. It’s great to be with you.

Meghan Henry:
We’re so glad to have you. Laura, before we dive in, you call yourself a wellbeing activator as opposed to a wellbeing expert. I’d love to hear why that is, and then if you could share a little bit about the niche that you see yourself filling in the field of health and wellbeing.

Laura Putnam:
Yeah. The first chapter of my book, “Workplace Wellness That Works,” is titled Shifting Your Mindset From Expert to Agent of Change. And while we certainly need expertise, we need science more than ever. We also need to be able to leverage that and think about how we can actually change hearts and minds and cultures. And that’s really where the role of an activator comes in. And so the particular niche that I am playing in this field is leveraging my background as an urban public high school teacher and applying a teacher’s sensibility toward this conundrum around better health and wellbeing, because really, so much of healthy lifestyle is simply about employing those best practices that we all already know, eat better, exercise enough, take care of yourself, those basic kind of practices.

Meghan Henry:
These are not new things that we’ve never heard of before.

Laura Putnam:
Exactly. So again, less about expertise and more about, how do we actually inspire people? How do we influence people? How do we activate people and teams and organizations and communities to actually make change?

Meghan Henry:
I really love that. I do think that that’s a gap that needs to be filled. So Laura, at the basic level, you as a wellbeing activator, how do you define wellbeing?

Laura Putnam:
I like to define it in a way that’s really simple and user-friendly, and the way I usually present it as is, me at my best. And perhaps Maya Angelou said it best when she said, “My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to fully thrive, and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” So that is perhaps one of the best ways to relay this idea of me at my best. And better health and the practice of a healthy lifestyle is really just a tool that enables each of us to become our best self, however we define that. And just like Maya Angelou defined it for herself, we all get to choose what me at my best looks like for us.

Meghan Henry:
So me at my best probably doesn’t look like what you at your best looks like, or my kids or my husband or whoever else.

Laura Putnam:
Exactly. And there are certainly some universal themes around what are the differentiators between those people who are thriving versus those people who are struggling or just surviving. It’s things like, we all know, physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, financial wellbeing, community wellbeing, career wellbeing. All of these kinds of things really matter. But again, we all need to have autonomy and choice in really casting for ourselves what that looks like for us.

The Knowing and Doing Gap

Meghan Henry:
When it comes to our health, most of us know what we should be doing. Generally, we don’t always do those things. You often talk about the knowing and doing gap, and you say things like, “Knowledge and being told to take personal responsibility for your health and wellbeing really isn’t enough.” Can you talk more about that? And what’s the driving force between this knowing and doing gap? What’s going on there?

Laura Putnam:
Yeah, I mean, I think that as an industry, the health promotion and wellbeing field has really leaned into the individual responsibility mantra. Better health and wellness is all about just taking personal responsibility for your health and wellbeing. And sure, there are things that we can all do, and yet if we look at the statistics, which is just on a very basic level, you’d be hard-pressed to find anybody who doesn’t know that it’s a good idea to get more exercise, to eat more broccoli, and you’d be hard-pressed to find any smoker who doesn’t know that smoking is bad for them.

And yet even with just those three basic behaviors, less than 3% of Americans do those three basic things. So there’s obviously a huge disconnect between what we know we should do and what we actually do. And so I pose this question all the time in my keynotes, in my workshops, and I ask people to consider why is it that there is such a disconnect between what people know they should do and what they actually do. And the kinds of responses that I usually get are things around, oh, people aren’t motivated. They don’t know where to start. They’re lacking knowledge.

And not enough conversation around the fact that, really, if you think about it, our environment and our cultures that we all operate within are really driving us toward the unhealthy choice. And scientists characterize this as so-called obesogenic environments, where the environment itself is really driving obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. So if we just take a couple of examples, if you think about something like getting more active, is it really about personal responsibility, or does it have more to do with the fact that our neighborhoods are better designed for our cars than they are for us getting physically active?

Or if you think about it, what’s the first thing that we’re teaching our kids in school? Sit and be still. What’s the first thing that we say when somebody comes into our home or our office? Have a seat. So everything in our culture really revolves around our chairs and being still. And we can say the same thing about any other practice around health and wellbeing. We feel this cultural pressure to always be on. And we know that fast food is much more accessible than the healthy option. So it’s those cultural and environmental drivers that we need to be collectively addressing better than we are right now, as opposed to putting so much of the burden of change just on the individual.

Meghan Henry:
Yeah. You mentioned access. I’ve recently moved to a neighborhood that has a gym within the neighborhood. Never was really a gym-goer, never really did that much. Now that there’s access to it, it doesn’t cost me anything, some of those barriers are gone, and it’s been easier, and I have been going when I haven’t in the past. And I think that access is so important. You think about access to healthy food. Not everyone has access to a Whole Foods around the corner. And if it is around the corner, maybe they don’t have the money to buy the things at Whole Foods. So I think that you’re right. I think that I knew, I know that going to the gym is good for me. I know that I need to be walking around the block. But now that things are easier and I’m able to do so, I do those things more often.

Laura Putnam:
That’s exactly right.

Meghan Henry:
I do go but not as much as I should.

Laura Putnam:
Right. I mean, The Trust for Public Land, for example, has studied access to nature, for example, and access to a park, and over 100 million Americans don’t have easy access to nature and to a park that’s nearby. So we have things… Wellness privilege is something to be thinking about. Do you have wellness privilege? Do you have the privilege to work within an organization in which it’s normal and it’s acceptable to take breaks, or are there organizational repercussions if you take a break, step outside and take a 10-minute walk, for example?

Cultural and Environmental Influencers in Workplace Health – The Four Levels

Meghan Henry:
Right, right. That’s great. You spoke earlier about cultural and environmental influencers. Can you share with me the four levels of cultural influence that you’ve spoken about?

Laura Putnam:
Yeah. I like to think about it in four levels, as you just mentioned. And this is really kind of an adaptation of a model that’s been out for a long time, called the socio-ecological model, that looks at these levels of cultural influence. So big picture is the world that I live in, so the community, the 10 mile radius within which I largely operate, am I healthier because of it or less so? And then dropping down a level is the places I go, particularly where I work if I’m an adult, if I’m a kid, the school that I go to, am I healthier because of it or less so? And then dropping down another level are teams that I’m a part of and the boss that I work for. Am I healthier because of them or less so?

Do I work for a boss that’s sending me late-night emails, and so I feel pressure from my boss to be responding to those? And then in the center of all that is, again, this idea of me at my best. What are the things that I can be doing to become my best self? But just starting to reframe the conversation from one of just, I’m going to take personal responsibility for my health and wellbeing, to instead start to think about, okay, given the world that I live in, given where I work, given the team that I’m on, the boss that I work for, how do I make the healthy choice? How do I become my best self? How do I navigate those currents, if you will, the currents that are pushing me toward better health and wellbeing, how do I take advantage of those, and then how do I work around those currents that are pushing me away from the healthy choice?

Meghan Henry:
So being able to take a step back and seeing those four levels and identifying where you are in all of that will give you the opportunity to make those decisions based on the information.

Laura Putnam:
Exactly. And that’s for the individual, and then for those people who are uniquely positioned to influence those four levels, that it is incumbent upon them to take added measures to really change the container within which these individuals are operating within, so that we’re starting to actually change the direction of the current so that everybody has wellness privilege, if you will. It’s not just for a few, but everybody is swimming in currents that are pushing them toward better health and wellbeing.

How to Enhance Workplace Health and Wellbeing

Meghan Henry:
Yeah, and what a great thing for people. I mean, that’s fantastic. Laura, let’s talk about your book a little bit, “Workplace Wellness That Works.” Why did you write the book? And then I’d love to hear from you some suggestions about what organizations can do to better enhance the wellbeing of their workforce. I know that’s a big, loaded question, but I suspect in your book, you’ve got some key things that we could discuss in that.

Laura Putnam:
There’s been this question that’s been going on for a long time now about, does workplace wellness work?

Meghan Henry:
For years.

Laura Putnam:
And there was an article that came out in The New York Times in 2014, which is the time when I was actually writing the book, and it was titled, Do Workplace Wellness Programs Work? And then it said, “Most don’t.” And the truth is that we have a unique opportunity here, which is the workplace is the place where most adults are spending the vast majority of their waking hours. So whether they’re spending it in a virtual sense, like many working adults are now, or if they’re actually there in person, here’s a unique opportunity to really create a container of better health and wellbeing, to create a culture of wellbeing, to create an environment of health and wellbeing so that everybody is just a little bit healthier because of where they work.

Great idea. The problem is, what we’ve all discovered the hard way, is that unlike the Field of Dreams, if you build it as in a workplace wellness program, they, as in the people that you’re trying to reach, they will not necessarily come. They will not necessarily engage. And in fact, the largest study to date on the impact of workplace wellness shows that about 80% of eligible employees just simply aren’t, or they’re just opting out. They’re not participating. So if we look at participation rates alone, we know that we’ve got a long ways to go.

But beyond that, we know that a lot of people feel like, even if they are participating, that these wellness programs feel like check the box, or they’re not really making a difference in people’s health and wellbeing. So “Workplace Wellness That Works,” I wrote that as a nod to that question, and really starting to uncover and share in user-friendly language some strategies that we can use so that we can take a good idea and actually get it to work. Some of those strategies include things like, let’s focus less on the individual and more on optimizing the environment and the culture around them.

And let’s also think about some things like, can we start with what’s right? That is, how can we bring a more positive flavor to this? I think a lot of people feel like these workplace wellness initiatives are actually really negative. It starts with, let’s begin with these biometric screenings, these health risk assessments, that are going to uncover all the things that you’re doing wrong, and then let’s fix you, which is not very motivating for most people and seems kind of scary.

Meghan Henry:
Sure.

Laura Putnam:
And so how do we instead help people, for example, to identify what they’re doing right, and then build on those wellbeing strengths, if you will, in order to become their healthier self, and then begin to address some of their challenges? But those are just a couple of the strategies and that are outlined in this book, 10 steps, actually, so that every organization can infuse wellbeing and vitality into the fabric of business as usual, so less about a program and more about really implementing a new way of doing business.

Meghan Henry:
It’s almost like a culture, a culture of wellness.

Laura Putnam:
Exactly, but a for real culture of wellbeing as opposed to a pretend one. I mean, a lot of companies I’ve seen that have the biggest bragging rights around having a culture of health, sure, they might have all the bells and whistles when it comes to health and wellbeing platforms and programs, but the larger culture is one that is actually just the antithesis of better health and wellbeing.

The Role Managers Play in Workplace Health

Meghan Henry:
Right. Laura, in your book, you touch on the role that managers play, and I know that that’s kind of become a focus of your work now that you do with organizations. Talk to me about how important managers are to workforce health and wellbeing.

Laura Putnam:
Yeah. There’s been a lot of emphasis on engaging senior leaders in wellness, and certainly senior leaders matter. They’re the ones who allocate resources. They’re the ones who really set the tone across the organization. But when it comes to the day-to-day permission-giving, if you will, that really comes down to the manager, the frontline manager. And every employee tends to really follow the ethos that is established by their direct supervisor. So you might be lucky enough to work for an organization in which the senior leaders are really talking about it, really promoting it, where there might be lots and lots of programs.

And yet if your direct supervisor, your direct manager, isn’t embodying that, isn’t talking about it, isn’t creating team-based systems to normalize wellbeing within the context of the team, it’s highly unlikely that you will be engaging them as well. So whether or not wellness is part of your job description if you’re a manager, every manager needs to know that they are uniquely positioned within the organization to either persuade or dissuade their team members from engaging with their wellbeing.

Meghan Henry:
So I guess an example of that could be if Susie says she needs to take a mental health day and how that manager reacts to that, whether the manager is supportive or whether that manager isn’t supportive of that, I think that those sorts of things are what the employees are seeing directly.

Laura Putnam:
I was in a coffee shop a couple months ago, and there was a group of young women who were in an animated discussion. And it turns out that they were all talking about their bosses, and all of these young women were runners, and they like to run during the day. And each of them talked about their manager and the extent to which their manager made it okay or didn’t make it okay for them to run during the workday. One was saying, “Oh, my manager is a runner, and so she actually runs during the day, so I know it’s okay for me to do the same.” And then another one was saying, “Oh my gosh, my manager’s just the opposite, so I always have to wait until after work to do it.”

So that’s not part of that team culture. And so certainly with mental health even more so, those managers who are really modeling engaging in self-care, particularly around mental health, who are talking about it, so helping to destigmatize it within the context of their team, and they are even going so far as to create some team-based systems that help to create kind of a safe Harbor within the team, those are the ones that, A, team members are more likely to come and talk to the boss about if they’re experiencing any mental health issues, but also ones where people are also even more likely to take advantages of resources that are available to them, like EAP.

Managers as Gatekeepers or Multipliers

Meghan Henry:
Laura, in your Managers on the Move program, you talk about how managers are gatekeepers or they’re multipliers, or they could be somewhere in between. Talk to me a little bit about what those are and explain those to me.

Laura Putnam:
So that’s a question that I ask managers to consider a lot, which is honestly, where would you say you are on the spectrum between being a multiplier, one who really enhances the wellbeing of your team members, or might you unwittingly be acting as a gatekeeper, actually getting in the way of your team members’ engagement with their health and wellbeing? Longstanding research from Gallup shows that the manager alone likely accounts for up to 70% of the variance of their team members’ engagement, both with their work as well as their wellbeing. And we all know, of course, that people don’t leave their job, by and large, they leave their boss.

But also, when it comes to health and wellbeing, the boss actually plays an oversized role in the extent to which we are well. And in fact, there was a frightening Swedish study that came out showing that if you have a negative boss, that can have a real impact on the health of your heart. So your boss matters more than your doctor does when it comes to the health of your heart.

Meghan Henry:
Wow.

Laura Putnam:
So when we hear people joking that, “My boss is killing me,” they actually kind of mean it. So it’s something that we can kind of joke about, but it’s also really serious, that managers really do play an outsized role in that. And so to become that multiplier, the three simple practices that I’ve been advocating for a long time is to do, speak, and create. So start with yourself, model wellbeing, do wellbeing loudly, if you will, so people can see you doing it. Speak, which is to talk about wellbeing.

So think about the difference between yet another email blast coming out from HR or from the wellness team about another upcoming wellness event versus your direct boss saying, “Hey, there’s a really cool event coming up on mindfulness. I’m going to be going. Who wants to join me?” Or even for one’s boss to say, “Hey, I’ve been really struggling with my mental health. Let’s have a conversation about this.” And then third, to create, to think about creating those team-based systems that really help to normalize it. And so every time a manager engages in do, speak, and create, they are moving to the right-hand side of the spectrum, moving away from being a gatekeeper to really becoming more of a multiplier of wellbeing for their team.

Meghan Henry:
And I would suspect as you as a manager talk about these sorts of things, you’re giving your employees permission to do the same, and you’re giving them, whether you say, “I support you,” or whether you just talk about your experiences, “I’m going to this mindfulness seminar, you should join,” that they are seeing that it’s okay, that they are seeing that-

Laura Putnam:
Exactly.

Meghan Henry:
… you’re doing it, so I can do it too.

Laura Putnam:
Yeah. I mean, this permission-giving is so important, especially now. For example, there was a study that came out in June of 2020 in which the researchers found that rates of depression or the symptoms of depression have tripled since the onset of the pandemic, not surprisingly. We know there are the physical effects of the pandemic, but then all of the mental health fallout that has accompanied that. Now, meanwhile, there was a study that came out not too long after that, finding that half of employees are afraid to talk about their mental health with their boss.

That’s a terrible combination. Again, here’s the reality of what’s happening with all of us as a result of the pandemic, and also things that were happening before then. And so we have this giant influx in terms of rising rates of burnout, for example, and so it is more important than ever that employees feel comfortable talking about things like mental health with their boss, with their team members. And managers are at the helm of making those conversations possible.

Leadership Supporting Mangers

Meghan Henry:
Now, we know that managers can’t do it on their own, that they’ve got to have support from the higher-ups, from the C-suite, from the organization as a whole. So let’s say I’m an HR person or I’m a leader in a company. What can I do to support my managers in supporting their employees?

Laura Putnam:
That’s exactly right. I mean, just as team members are looking to their direct manager to, quote, give them permission, managers want to make sure that it’s okay. And again, that’s where senior leaders are so important, because they need to be communicating to their managers over and over again just how important that is. So a couple of examples of that. I was delivering a so-called Managers on the Move workshop, which is our flagship leadership meets wellbeing training program that’s designed for managers around how they can become this multiplier of wellbeing.

So I’m conducting this Managers on the Move workshop at a company called Healthstat, which is an onsite clinic provider. And during the workshop, these managers start shaking their heads, and they’re like, “We can be talking about this, but do our senior leaders actually support this?” And so the CEO actually came in during the workshop. The CEO, kind of a colorful character named Crockett Dale, he came and he was like, “Yes, I am supporting this.” He kind of signed the symbolic declaration of independence in front of all of them, saying, “Yes, I support wellbeing. I am giving you permission to really put this front and center.”

Those are the kinds of things that senior leaders can be doing. Another case Is Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota, another company that I’ve been working with where we’ve run this program over the course of a year and a half. And they actually recently changed their vision mission statement in which it is explicitly stated now, elevate wellbeing. Elevate wellbeing. And so, again, managers, in their call to action to lead the business, to play their role in that, wellbeing is part of that.

Meghan Henry:
And I think you’re right. You’ve got to walk the walk and you’ve got to talk the talk. There’s a big difference between putting it in writing and just saying, “These are the 10 things that we’re going to do to help your health and wellbeing,” and we move on, but really putting your money where your mouth is and making those efforts.

Laura Putnam:
That’s exactly right. And better health and wellbeing is not a one-time event. It’s the day in and day out, regular occurrences. That’s the definition of a healthy lifestyle. And again, that’s where the manager plays such an essential role, but again, they need to know that they have permission to really prioritize it.

Advice for Managers

Meghan Henry:
Right, right. Hey, Laura, we’ve got a lot of people who listen to this podcast that are explicitly focused on health and wellbeing, whether they’re HR advisors, whether they’re benefits advisors, wellness consultants. I would love to hear any tips or advice you have for those folks.

Laura Putnam:
I think about, in terms of who I serve in the work that I do, I think about it in three buckets. One is the bucket of influencers. Those are the people who, whether or not they’re embracing health and wellbeing, they are in a position of influence. These are your senior leaders. These are your managers, for sure, within the context of an organization. Then there’s the bucket of the anybody and everybody, so the larger work population. What are the things that I as an individual can do? Given those circles of cultural influence, what can I do to improve my health and wellbeing?

And then there are the people who are like me. They’re activators. They are in a role where they are explicitly given the mandate to promote better health and wellbeing, often within the context of an organization. So Workplace Wellness That Works, that book was written primarily to that audience. What can you do if you are in that explicit role? So a couple of tips. One is the one that we talked about at the beginning, which is to shift your mindset from expert to agent of change. You don’t have to be the smartest person. You have to be the one who actually moves people.

So what are the best practices of people like Oprah Winfrey, and are you studying her techniques around persuasion? Because that’s the number one thing that you’re going to need to be doing, is not delivering statistics, but delivering stories that move people. How do you not only move people on a logical level, but also on an emotional level? Then thinking about things like, what are things that you could do so you more strategically change the culture and the environment around the people that you are serving? And how might you even use strategies like going stealth, which is one of the chapters In Workplace Wellness That Works, which is really thinking about recasting language in language that resonates for the organization.

For example, one company that I did a lot of work with is Schindler Elevator Corporation. And so in talking about wellbeing, I recast it in the language of building winning teams. Or, for example, might you talk about energy as opposed to wellness and health? Do you, as a leader or as a manager, have the energy that you need to be an effective leader? Oh, and do your team members? Does your team have the energy that it needs to be a high performing team?

Meghan Henry:
So you’ve got to know your employees to know how to talk to them, is what I’m hearing, that you’ve got to have enough information, got to know what makes them tick to be able to speak to them in such a way that will get them going.

Laura Putnam:
That’s exactly right. And you have to also know the language that resonates within the organization. If you’re an activator that’s working in an organization that’s putting only a few resources toward wellness, but meanwhile, they’re putting a ton of resources towards, say, safety, there’s your stealth opportunity. Instead of trying to sell standalone wellness programs, why not go to safety and think about infusing a little bit of wellbeing in the context of the next safety training, for example?

Tips for Employees to Improve Workplace Health

Meghan Henry:
That’s great. That’s great. Laura, you mentioned the bucket of everyday employees. I’d love to know, do you have any tips or advice for them if they’re looking to improve their health and wellbeing?

Laura Putnam:
Very similar to what we were talking about at the beginning, to first and foremost, just think about looking at those currents within their life. Stepping back, taking a look at, what are the currents that are pushing me toward better health and wellbeing? How do I leverage those better, and then what are the currents that I’m going to have to swim around, if you will? And the more that I as an individual can optimize my own environment and culture, the more likely I am to be able to improve my health and wellbeing.

I would say another thing is for every individual to lean less into motivation because the research really shows that motivation is actually a really limited resource, and to think more about, how do I just make the healthy choice the easy choice? The first thing that I do when I bring my groceries home is take out all the produce, wash it, put it in glass containers so that it’s really accessible, and so when I have that moment of being hungry, that it’s that much easier to reach for the carrot as opposed to reach for the crackers…

Meghan Henry:
Sure. Yeah.

Laura Putnam:
… because they’re all ready to go.

Meghan Henry:
That’s great. Well, Laura, I really appreciate it… This has been such great information, and I know that we’ve got a lot of great takeaways. Before we hop off, would love to know, do you have a website, social handle, anything that you’d like to share with our audience? Because you’ve really shown us that you know so much great information, and I know that there may be folks who are looking for more.

Laura Putnam:
Yeah, you bet. And I’m happy to share that and add one more thing to think about for every individual, as well as every activator-

Meghan Henry:
Absolutely.

Laura Putnam:
… as well as for every influencer, which is this idea of really casting wellbeing or me at my best as a gift, as opposed to a chore. And I think so often, we really think about health and wellness as being a chore. This is what I do to lose weight. This is what I do so I can get healthier. And boy, does that become a drag. And instead to really remember that the fact that we can move, for example, is one of our greatest gifts. So how can we start to think about this as a gift, as opposed to a chore?

Meghan Henry:
I love that. I love that.

Laura Putnam:
And also knowing that each of us can start with ourselves, and when we do, we actually can create a ripple effect that really influences not only our friends, but our friends’ friends, and even our friends’ friends’ friends. So each of us really are change-makers no matter where we are positioned within an organization, within a team, or within a community. Those are a couple of key takeaways.

Meghan Henry:
And I would think even in the workplace, if you do those sorts of things, coworkers catch on to that and coworkers participate. “I’m going for a walk, Susie. You want to come with me?” Those sorts of things. I know in my office, we had some coworkers that were eating Subway every day, and the Subway was in the building, and I would go out and I’d eat other things. And I’m like, man, they’re going to Subway and they’re doing it right. And so more of us started going to Subway, and then there was a group of all of us that started to eat healthier during lunch because of them, and we saw how good they were feeling and how happy they were with it. So I think that makes a big difference, too.

Laura Putnam:
Yeah, we can all take heart in the fact that we are already a change maker, and so how do we do that? How do we be a change maker in a positive way? The ways that you can stay in touch with me, MotionInfusion.com is the website, as well as LauraPutnam.com is the website. You can also find me on social media, on LinkedIn, on Instagram, on Facebook, and on Twitter. And the handle on Twitter is @MotionInfusion, and on Instagram as well as on Facebook, it’s @LauraPutnamAuthor, and on LinkedIn, you can just look up under Laura Putnam.

Meghan Henry:
Thank you so much for taking the time to chat with us today. This has really been a great conversation. I’ve really enjoyed it.

Laura Putnam:
Thank you so much, Meghan.

Meghan Henry:
That does it for today’s episode of For Your Benefits. Thanks to all of you for joining us. If you like what you heard, don’t forget to subscribe to our podcast. And if you’d like to learn more about SentryHealth and WellOnMyWay, visit our website at SentryHealth.com. Have a fantastic day.

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