5 Key Ways to Rehumanize the Workplace
For Your Benefits
For Your Benefits
5 Key Ways to Rehumanize the Workplace
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5 Key Ways to Rehumanize the Workplace

Imagine a workplace where each person feels that they’re bringing their best selves to work each day. They leave the workday feeling supported, inspired, and heard. But is this happening?

In this episode of For Your Benefits, we talk with Dr. Rosie Ward, about how to rehumanize the workplace in a world that is rapidly becoming more complex with disruptions being the norm.

With The Great Resignation holding strong, organizations need to ask themselves if they’re putting their people first or continuing with the business-as-usual approach. Do employees feel comfortable taking risks and expressing themselves without fear of embarrassment or retribution? Discover the five key re-humanizing principles that thriving organizations are using to help future proof your organization.

Like workplace culture, a good health benefits package can also lead employees to feel job satisfaction. In a recent blog, Ensuring Health Benefits Packages Work Today & Beyond, you’ll discover the key components that should be addressed to ensure that their health benefits package is future-proofed.

In This Podcast

Dr. Rosie Ward

Dr. Rosie Ward is a fierce advocate for humanity who is sought-after to help rehumanize workplaces that free, fuel, and inspire people to bring their best selves to work – and home – each day. She is known for challenging and inspiring people to think differently about what it takes to become the best version of themselves and for organizations to foster their growth and development. Rosie has an incredible gift for taking complex ideas about culture, leadership, behavior change, and what it means to be human and synthesizing them in a way that makes them relevant, understandable, and meaningful for people. She currently lives in Minneapolis with her husband and son.

Meghan Henry:
Hey everyone and welcome back to For Your Benefits, the podcast where we talk with leadership experts, HR professionals, benefits advisors, and more about what’s going on in the world of employee health and wellbeing. I’m Meghan Henry, Director of Marketing at SentryHealth, sponsors of the For Your Benefits Podcast. Today, we are so excited to be chatting with Dr. Rosie Ward about ways to future-proof your organization by rehumanizing the workforce.

Let’s talk a little bit about who Rosie is. She completed her PhD in organization and management where she focused on organizational culture, leadership, and coaching, and she currently serves as CEO and co-founder of Salveo Partners. It’s a professional consulting and training company that’s focused on equipping organizations to find success while putting people back at the forefront of their business. Rosie has also authored two books with her co-founder, “How to Build a Thriving Culture at Work” and “Rehumanizing the Workplace.” Rosie, thank you for joining us today.

Rosie Ward:
My pleasure. Thank you for having me.

Meghan Henry:
Absolutely. So let’s start off by learning a little bit more about you. I’d love to hear what you’re passionate about and what kind of led you to where you are today.

Rosie Ward:
I am most passionate about people being able to show up fulfilled and authentic in their lives and not feel like they have to hold back, silence themselves, hide their inadequacies, and really just have an opportunity to bring their gifts and talents in whatever way that means for them into the world and the workplace. I think why I’m so passionate about this, is twice in my career I have had the unfortunate experience of being in toxic work environments that didn’t allow that, where there was a lot of armor, there was a lot of self-protection, there was lack of psychological safety, poor leadership, poor culture, the list goes on and on.

Humanizing the Workplace

Rosie Ward:
In both of those times, I found my own personal well-being being sucked out of me. Everything from getting sick, emotional wellbeing, stress, you name it. Even though I have degrees in this area, it can get sucked out of you. I noticed the ripple effect it had on the people that I care most about. Just life is too short to have to work for a place that really sucks your humanity and sucks the livelihood out of you and actually can erode your health and wellbeing. My son is 11 and I don’t want him to ever have to experience that. I don’t want that for him. So I’m so passionate about helping workplaces become more human where that experience is no longer rewarded, it’s no longer necessary, and that we can just do better.

Meghan Henry:
Are companies open to this concept?

Rosie Ward:
Absolutely. I think that even more so, the past 18 plus months with the ongoing pandemic and just the crises in the world, the reckoning with social justice, and just all that’s happening I think has brought to light even more how much humanity is needed and people are demanding it. I would say that for the past 15 plus years, really largely led by the Conscious Capitalism Movement and looking at there is a better way of doing business and actually seeing that these conscious human organizations, at least the publicly traded ones that they have data on, are outperforming the S&P 500 by a 14-to-1 ratio over the long haul and that it makes good business sense to actually put your people first and to be conscious and intentional about your culture and your stakeholders and your leadership.

So that whole organization and movement globally has been leading the way and layered on top of that what’s been happening in our world. I think the great resignation that we’re hearing about and the turnover tsunami and what you’re finding is organizations that have not paid attention to the things that have a thriving human workplace are the ones that are struggling to keep their people, are the ones that are challenged the most right now. So I think there’s definitely elevated and renewed interest in why we need to get rid of “business as usual” that was literally killing us even before the pandemic and start to embrace better ways of doing things, which there are so many great examples of companies and so much research now that helps pave that path of what we can do differently.

ReHumanizing the Workplace: Pre-Pandemic vs Now

Meghan Henry:
What do you mean when you talk about rehumanizing the workplace? Then I’d love to hear why that is so important.

Rosie Ward:
There’s a lot of people that have done research in this space, but one of the ones we lean towards is Jeffrey Pfeffer’s research out of Stanford. His research has looked at how our workplaces are killing us. In fact, he wrote a book called Dying for a Paycheck and that these toxic dehumanized workplaces with poor leadership literally are accounting for a lot of excess stress in the workplace that is then leading to excess deaths, and not just in the United States, but globally. He has all kinds of stats that he cites. Again, pre-pandemic, that these toxic dehumanized workplaces were the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and accounted for 8% of our healthcare spend.

Meghan Henry:
Oh my gosh.

Rosie Ward:
Again, that was pre-pandemic. Then now if you start to look at over the last two years, whether it’s Deloitte in their annual human capital trends report, or McKinsey has been putting out all kinds of research, or Gartner. I mean, right now, the latest stats are that 47% of employees feel disconnected from their teams and their organizations. Even those that are going in, feel disconnected. We know that attrition is at an all-time high and people are tired. In fact, one of the stats that I recently came across was that today’s average employees can only absorb half as much change as they can manage in 2019.

So you look at there’s been so much change and so much disruption and so much chaos. Are we looking at people’s ability to navigate this space? Or are we just kind of telling them to suck it up and plow through? Are we looking at our organizational systems helping people navigate that space? Because again, we can’t keep putting stuff back on the individual or expect a changed individual to go back to an unchanged system and expect that we’re going to have different results. So really, when we look at that dehumanization, it’s yes, these workplaces are killing us. Then if you even look at the racial reckoning that’s going on and the global social justice crisis and people feeling like they can’t be their authentic selves and just deeply embedded isms, right?

Whether it’s racism or sexism or ageism or whatever, there are so many isms that are deeply embedded in our systems that are just leading to people not being seen as a human being and feeling it and feeling dismissed and outcast and it’s just… I think that there’s a growing intolerance, rightfully so, of people saying, “Enough. If this pandemic has taught me anything, it’s that I deserve better, we deserve better, we’re demanding better,” and they’re sticking with it. They’re leaving organizations, they’re leaving the workforce, they’re changing careers, they’re setting boundaries. So it’s a whole different world that we have to find a path forward in and we have to reconcile.

The Five Key Rehumanizing Principles

Meghan Henry:
So let’s talk about how we can do that. In your book, Rehumanizing the Workplace, you’ve got five key principles that you say can help organizations create work environments where employees feel comfortable taking risks, feel comfortable expressing themselves without fear of embarrassment, retribution. I’d love to talk about each of these five principles. So let’s begin with building a lighthouse. What do you mean by that?

Build a Lighthouse

Rosie Ward:
So think about what a lighthouse does. It’s this tall beacon and that is in the middle of rough waters and it shines this light out. So when you have dark, rough, choppy waters, it provides this sense of direction, provides a sense of calm in the midst of the storm of where the ships and the boats should head. So when we think about what that build a lighthouse does in an organization is it’s a couple of things.

One, it is having a true, clear purpose, right? Not some vague, gassy mission statement or what you do, but purpose beyond what you do, beyond your products and services that people feel connected to, that they believe, that provides that energy.

If you look at Kevin Oakes’ research from the Institute for Corporate Productivity and others, we know that regardless of the generation, people are longing to work for an organization that has a clear sense of purpose that they feel connected to. We want that sense of belonging and meaning. So having that clear purpose of this is what we’re about as an organization, this is what we believe, and then hand in hand with that are our values. I’m not talking about the words that are on a website or a wall that are vague, that are gassy, that we’ve actually taken steps to operationalize those core values, meaning that we have very specific behaviors of this is what we mean, right? This is how we show up.

So people can use it as a filter and it’s really crystal clear. If our purpose or our why is going to be realized, these are the non-negotiable behaviors, that are essential that we hire too, we onboard too, we develop to, we have difficult performance conversations too. So they anchor us in the midst of that storm and they help us find our path forward.

If you think about the organizations and businesses over the last 18 plus months that have been able to come through all of this chaos as stronger, better versions of themselves, they’ve had that clear lighthouse, which allows them to be able to pivot their products, their services, how they… Do they physically go in or not, and still be able to have that sense of belonging, still have that sense of purpose, still have that path forward for people on a day in day out basis.

So on the organizational level, it’s supercritical. On the individual level, we know there are tremendous health benefits when we feel connected to our own purpose. So are we helping individuals also get that clarity of their purpose and values and then sync it up or line it up to I know that when I am walking in my purpose and I am walking in alignment with my values each and every day, I know how I can serve the organization and it amplifies. So that’s really what the lighthouse principle is.

Create Fearless Environments

Meghan Henry:
That’s fantastic. Next, you say it’s important to create a fearless environment. So tell me how can leaders create that fearless environment that’s going to help employees excel in their jobs? What can they do?

Rosie Ward:
Yeah, there’s lots they can do. This is from the great work of Amy Edmondson. I mean, she’s phenomenal on psychological safety, and really looking at that psychological safety resides at the local team level. So predominantly, people leaders of those teams set the tone of whether or not psychological safety is present. So things like being willing to be vulnerable and say, “Hey, I messed up,” or being willing to say, “Hey, I don’t have the answer,” even saying, “What do you think about that? It’s okay to be wrong here.” Or, “You know what, we don’t have all the answers here.” Or, “Hey, I know this is a difficult conversation. I know this is a difficult topic or a difficult time, but I want everyone’s voices to be in the room.”

Or if somebody is blaming or shaming, that they are saying, “Hey, we’re not going to do that here. How can we be curious instead?” So they really are intentional and adamant about modeling vulnerability, modeling curiosity, intentionally stating that this is a safe place to share your ideas, mining for maybe people who are more introverted or have been holding back. Those are the types of things where people… I think there’s a misconception that in these fearless environments or psychologically safe teams, it’s all unicorns and rainbows, that they’re all… That’s not the case.

They find that if you look at Project Aristotle from Google that the most effective teams with psychological safety, are speaking up, they are challenging one another. They are having the difficult conversations because they know it makes it better and it’s safe to do so. They’re not holding back because, oh, somebody might get mad at me or someone might retaliate. So it’s really the leader’s job to intentionally through meetings and conversations and modeling to make it safe for people to not have to show up hiding their inadequacies, trying to pretend to have it all together, where they can just be real and share concerns, share ideas, speak up.

Meghan Henry:
So really, a company could set out all of these things, like you said, put it on the website, even embed these into operations and things that they’re doing. But if the managers aren’t supporting, the managers aren’t offering those opportunities for safe spaces, it doesn’t matter anyway, I would suspect.

Yeah, they go hand in hand. In fact, a lot of times you’ll see that some of these purpose and culture efforts will start at the top and they fall apart at the front line level. So it’s really critical that leaders are equipped. Also, how do you lead an alignment with it? Because you know what, people leaders are people too, which will get into the next rehumanizing principle, but we all have our own crap and we’re humans before we’re fill in the blank, whatever our role is. I think we forget that sometimes.

So if we are not actually making it safe for leaders to do their work so that they can… Because they may have the best intentions and want to create a fearless environment, but they’re getting in their own way, their humanity is getting the best of them. So we’ve got to be really mindful of that too, that are we supporting people because most people actually… The way we develop leaders is not what is actually needed.

Meghan Henry:
Well, and that’s what I was about to say is I suspect there are a lot of managers that don’t have those skills, that haven’t had the training, don’t really know how to create that safe space for their employees or for their team members. So I think the organizations need to step in and help out with that.

Rosie Ward:
Oh, absolutely. In fact, some of the latest research again from McKinsey and Gartner was actually looking at trends with leadership development. If you think about it a lot of what used to be called soft skills, so emotional intelligence and self-awareness are now actually being called essential skills and power skills because a lot of traditional leadership development focuses on the wrong thing. It focuses on practices and behaviors or what’s called the outer game of leadership versus the inner game of leadership, which is our meaning-making system or identity our values.

They’re both important. Don’t get me wrong. But what we know is that the inner game actually runs the outer game. So we need a really, really solid inner game and layered on top of that a well-honed outer game, but usually we have it backwards. We go to the outer game stuff because it’s tangible. It seems easier. For example, I could give a leader of a team conversation starters of here’s how you create a fearless environment. But if their inner game is like, oh my gosh, I will look weak if I do that or I’m a fraud if I do that or… They’re not going to use that stuff.

So you’ve got to help them strengthen that inner game. So you’re thankfully starting to see a shift in how we look at who we even define as a leader because we can’t just reserve development for high potentials or a few people in the C-suite. We actually need to start to develop everybody as leaders. Are we developing them in a way that is from the inside out, that is from the inner game then to the outer game? So it’s a huge shift in looking at… There’s a big difference between training and development, right? Training, I’m going to go learn skills very appropriate for the outer game. Development, inner work. It’s hard, it’s messy, but it’s essential.

Meghan Henry:
It’s funny to think that these soft skills were seen as nice to have, not essential. Now my goodness.

Rosie Ward:
Yeah, yeah.

Meghan Henry:
You can’t attract and retain employees that way. Who wants to work for somebody who doesn’t have empathy for another person or who doesn’t create that space?

Rosie Ward:
Yeah. Well, and if you look at all the research like Brene Brown, leading the space and empathy research, or you look at all the emotional intelligent research, those are the number one factors that determine whether or not someone’s going to be more effective in, really effective, period, but also if you have a formal people leadership role. Yeah.

Meghan Henry:
Yeah, yeah.

About WellOnMyWay

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Wade in the Messy Middle: Third Key Principle

Meghan Henry:
Okay, so Rosie, the third key principle is wade in the messy middle.

Rosie Ward:
That gets into what we were just talking about with the inner game versus the outer game of leadership. So Bob Anderson and Bill Adams talk about this inner and outer game and they use the vernacular of our inner operating system. I really like that. Why I like that is if you think about a computer, so let’s say you were trying to run the Microsoft 365 suite of software on a computer that was still running Windows XP, or was still running a DOS operating system, right? Your Word, your Excel, your PowerPoint, it’s going to crash. Fonts aren’t going to match up. It’s not going to work. You’re going to probably want to throw that computer off the window where it’s like, “Ah, it doesn’t work.” Right?

Meghan Henry:
Right, right.

Rosie Ward:
Because you’re trying to install this stuff that the underlying operating system can’t support its functionality. Or if you haven’t done an operating system upgrade on your phone for years, the same thing, apps are going to crash. It’s going to start acting all funky.

As human beings, we’re not out machines, but it’s very similar is if we don’t do the work to upgrade our inner operating system, where we’re moving from being really reactive and guarded and armored and self-protective to one of clarity of purpose, of acting with intention, of owning that just because we have a thought doesn’t mean it’s accurate, leaning to curiosity instead of trying to be right, challenging our meaning-making system, challenging our self-limiting assumptions.

That’s really what we’re talking about. It’s messy, it’s hard. It’s uncomfortable. It is not a quick fix and-

Meghan Henry:
It’s messy.

Rosie Ward:
It’s messy and you’re going to get it wrong and you’re going to have missteps and it’s going to feel awkward. The reality is is that we know. What’s so funny is we know that growth does not happen in our comfort zone.

Meghan Henry:
Right.

Rosie Ward:
But yet we don’t… Right. We want to try to fast-forward it. So if there was a fast-forward button, man, I would be first in line. Right? But there isn’t. So when we think about that messy middle, it’s a combination of, one, if we’re asking people to wade in the messy middle and do that inner work, they can’t do it if there’s not a fearless environment. So let’s just be clear, right?

Anchored on that purpose, if I don’t understand why, how does this help the organization or how does this help me get better or how does it help us do that better, it needs something to anchor onto. So they all kind of build off each other.

But also with that, with wading in the messy middle, it also means that we’ve got to give ourselves and each other a little more grace. We’ve got to really recognize that we’re striving for better not perfection. All the things that just go. If we want people to change the way they show up, whether it’s how they behave at work or let’s bring it into even health behaviors, you know what, trying to scare and pressure people with incentives and or sticks is not how we do it. We have to help people shift if that inner narrative around how do they value themselves, right?

Do they love themselves or not? Are they setting healthy boundaries? Why aren’t they setting healthy boundaries if they’re not? Why do they care for themselves in some areas and not others? There’s so much to it when it comes to our wellbeing in our effectiveness at organizations that is all related to at messy middle, that we have to support people to go through, not trying to short circuit behavior change with outdated approaches.

Fourth Key Principle: Show up as a Leader

Meghan Henry:
So Rosie, why is it important for all employees, not just those in leadership roles, but everybody to show up as a leader, which is your fourth key principle to rehumanizing the workplace?

Rosie Ward:
Yeah. I would say this is probably my favorite, which is why I named my podcast Show Up As A Leader. Because if you look at there’s a lot of different definitions out there of leadership and we coined ours being inspired by these other ones. So there are many like this, but we fundamentally define leadership as it’s maximizing our positive impact on the world by becoming our best, fully authentic self, which is that inner game stuff and supporting those around us to break past barriers and step into their greatness.

Rosie Ward:
So we’re really looking at there’s an inner self-leadership component and there’s an outer game leading and influencing others. If we look at that in other similar definitions, leadership is not a title or a role. It’s really a behavior or a set of behaviors. If you think about we probably all can name people who have the title, role, power, authority, job description, pay grade that on paper they look like a leader but they are no way a leader, right?

Meghan Henry:
Right, right.

Rosie Ward:
I’ve seen people with C-suite titles, I’ve worked with them, I’ve coached them, and I’m like, “Oh hell no, you’re not a leader.” Right? I know people that don’t have the pay grade, the power, the authority and they are absolutely a leader.

Meghan Henry:
Yeah, yeah.

Rosie Ward:
Right? If you think about it, if you look again at this world that we are living and working in that is chaotic and uncertain, and disruptive, we need everybody to start to look at how can I show up as a leader at work and in my personal life, am I looking for an opportunity today where I can maximize my positive impact. I mean, imagine if we all did that, right? And that, you know what, don’t we need people on our teams to look at, hey, this could be better, or, hey, I have this idea or I’m going to share this concern or I’m going to go take care of that. I’m going to have that mindset of what would a leader do here. Am I going to sit back and throw my hands back and be apathetic and wait for someone “more qualified” to solve the problems? Or am I going to lean in and go, “How can I make a difference here?”

Rosie Ward:
It could be like, you know what, I’m going to open the door for somebody and I’m going to be kind or I’m going to say, thank you or I’m going to not turn away when someone’s hurting or what. I mean, there are little things we can do in our personal lives. Then certainly at work, there are lots of things we can do as well.

So that’s really what the show up as a leader principle is we, in this world, we can’t… That’s why even if you look at development efforts, they’re starting to say instead of leadership development, we should really look at it as people development because don’t we need everybody to be able to show up with a strong inner game. Self-awareness, emotional intelligence, making that positive impact, and being able to communicate well and have accountability conversations and all the things that come with the outer game. We need everybody to do that or we’re not going to get anywhere as a society or as workplaces.

Meghan Henry:
I think managers would want their teams to be leaders. They don’t want to be telling everyone what to do all the time. They want everyone to perform as a leader, not be threatened by it, but really be supported by that and appreciative of that.

Rosie Ward:
Well, for sure. We’ve all heard the saying that people don’t want to be managed, they want to be led.

Final Key Principle: Find Your Tribe

Meghan Henry:
In order to build a thriving workplace, you’ve said that it takes a village. It’s not a solo journey. That brings us to our final principle, which is to find your tribe. So tell me why is that key.

Rosie Ward:
Culture is not the C-suite’s responsibility. It is not HR’s responsibility. It is not fill in the blank’s responsibility. It’s everybody’s responsibility. Culture is built team by team. So it’s not even just the people leader’s responsibility. It’s everybody. We all can either contribute to or contaminate our team culture and the broader workplace culture.

We know that as human beings, we are neurobiologically hardwired to be in connection with one another that so this isn’t a solo journey. It’s not one person riding on a white horse. We do it through relationships because we all have also different strengths and gifts and talent.

So when we looked at the find your tribe principle, we also were very intentional about language in that if you look at, as it states today, tribalism, it’s not a good thing, right? It’s the antithesis of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging, because it’s let’s find people that are like me, that I feel safe around, right, and I can just kind of hide behind. But if you go to the ancient roots of the word tribe, it was really a group of people that have one another’s backs.

So when we think about finding your tribe, it’s that we need to be in connection with others but we also… This is where, in order to do that, we have to seek out people who are different than us and get curious and seek to understand this is where if we are truly going to have cultures and environments that are rich with belonging, right, and inclusivity, it can’t be because we’re sitting here in our bubble and our safety net.

To find your tribe is really in the broadest sense of its find and seeking out people who are different than you, build and strength and relationships, because change happens with those relationships. You think about grassroots organizing, right? You build a relationship, you build some momentum and you grow from there and you grow from there and you grow from there. That’s really what that principle is encompassing.

Meghan Henry:
So it’s going beyond finding your people because finding my people, I could think of it as being, I’m going to find 40 something year old white women who live in my neighborhood who have two kids like I do it. It’s going well beyond that.

Rosie Ward:
Yeah, absolutely.

Meghan Henry:
Than that.

Rosie Ward:
Yeah, yeah. So if you think about in organizations, for example, I’ll talk about how often are the people who are charged with workplace safety actually talking to the people who are charged with workplace benefits, are actually talking to the people who do training and development, are actually talking to people who do leadership development, are actually talking to the strategy officer. They’re siloed and they’re doing their own thing and they’re all trying to affect change, they’re all trying to impact the employee experience in a bubble, versus, hey, what if I went and talked to the person, because what happens is people start to get very turf protectee and think like, “Oh my gosh, well, if I suddenly talk to that person or if some of my what I’m charged with, now that person does, then somehow it means that I’m irrelevant or I don’t have value.”

So people hoard. They disconnect try to protect what’s theirs versus going, man, if we just started to cross boundaries and really have cross-functional teams and really started to have interdisciplinary conversations, it’s one human experience at work, and are we unintentionally undermining each other or are we actually collaborating.

So it’s that as well as am I seeking out people who, yeah, who look different than me, talk differently than me, were raised differently than me because we all have blind spots and bubbles. So it’s really being intentional. I think Adam Grant talks about we have to unlearn and relearn. It’s being very intentional about rethinking and relearning over and over and over and over again. We can’t do that if we’re always with the same people.

Meghan Henry:
Making the effort to expand our bubble.

Rosie Ward:
Yeah, yeah.

What Leaders Can Do to Influence a More Humanized Approach

Meghan Henry:
Excellent. So Rosie, at SentryHealth, we are interested in improving employee health, improving employee wellbeing. I know that you talk a little bit about that. So I’d love to hear from you why should leaders stop thinking about employee health and wellbeing as a singular program and really looking at the culture of their workplace and thinking about what they can do to influence a more humanized approach.

Rosie Ward:
Well, I will say first and foremost, because the relationship people have with their direct supervisor has a greater impact on their health and wellbeing than the relationship they have with their primary care provider. So people who have that formal people leadership role have a greater influence in my wellbeing, in my day-to-day experience than anybody else. So one, that’s why you should care, right?

Meghan Henry:
Right.

Rosie Ward:
If you think about it, if you lose your best people, how hard is it on you? So they should care deeply because we always say in leadership training, like it or not, as a formal people leader, you are the topic of dinner conversations. This is not about whether or not people like you.

There’s an exercise I like to do where I ask people to think about the worst leader they’ve ever had. In fact, they would call them a boss, probably not a leader. what did that person do? Getting into behaviors. What’s the impact it had on them? People always will say, “Well, the impact it had on me is I disengage. I shut down. I didn’t want to bring my best to work. I started looking for another job.”

Meghan Henry:
Don’t care anymore.

Rosie Ward:
I don’t care. Right? Then go, “Okay. Then think about the best leader you’ve ever had and think about what did that person do that has you describe them as the best leader and what’s the impact they had on you.” You have things like, I felt energized to come to work. I wanted to stretch myself. I wanted to contribute. I went above and beyond. So right then and there, if you are a formal people leader, just think about if you’ve had the opportunity to have kind of the worst boss and best leader experiences in the course of your working history, think about what that did to you personally.

Then think about what impact, not about whether they like you or not, what impact do you actually want to have, and do you want people that are disengaged, that are stressed out, that are losing their confidence, that are confused? Or do you want people who are thriving? Guess what, you can make that positive impact if you’re creating that environment for the best boss impact or the best leader impact. It helps you out and you shine when other people who are within your span of care shine. So I think that’s first and foremost why, if you just take it to a human level, why we actually should care.

I would say if someone actually doesn’t care, if they’re focused just on the numbers or the productivity goals or the objectives that have been handed down from the strategic plan, you can’t achieve those without people. So if your people are fried and they’re burned out and they can’t bring their best selves to work, that’s on… I mean, that’s not only on you because there can be other things, but you have the largest influence to be able to change that.

I’ve heard so many people who maybe the organization has dysfunction and its challenges, but they feel like they’re almost in a bubble because they’ve got an amazing direct supervisor. They’ve got an amazing team where they have that fearless environment, where they kind of have that buffer between maybe whatever’s going on with the dysfunction or chaos in the organization. As a result, they’re doing okay.

So I don’t think leaders can afford to not care about the well-being of their people. Do I actually take the time to say, “How are you doing? No, really, how are you doing? I actually invest in you as a human being. I care about you as a human being. I know you as a human being. I also know you as an employee and I know what work fulfills you and I know how to help you leverage your gifts and talents.” It’s every aspect of wellbeing.

Meghan Henry:
Rosie, I want to thank you for taking the time to chat with us today. I know that we’ve got some people who are really going to enjoy what you’ve had to say and those are some great takeaways. Before we go, do you have a social handle, website? I know you’ve got a podcast. Anything you’d like to share with our listeners?

Rosie Ward:
Two websites. One is drrosieward.com, on there, my podcast, Show Up As A Leader. You can also get Show Up As A Leader wherever you get your podcasts. We have the show pages. We have courses. We have blogs, all kinds of thought leadership stuff there. Then salveopartners.com is our business website. That’s where we have all of our consulting services. We have training programs, all of our leadership development services. You name it, it’s there as well.

I can be found on LinkedIn @RosieWard. Twitter is Dr. Rosie. Facebook and Instagram, Dr. Rosie Ward.

Meghan Henry:
All right, very good. We will link to all of that on our show notes as well. Dr. Rosie, thank you for joining us today. This was fantastic. Really appreciate it.

Rosie Ward:
Thank you for having me. My pleasure.

Meghan Henry:
That does it for today’s episode of For Your Benefits. We want to thank all of you for joining us. If you like what you heard today, don’t forget to subscribe to our podcast, For Your Benefits. If you want to learn more about SentryHealth, visit our website at www.SentryHealth.com. See you guys next time.

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